skillet chocolate chip pumpkin bread

I won’t make any more promises about pumpkin recipes.

I feel as if cast iron skillets are quintessential for Fall baking. They remind me of the warmth of fireplaces and the heartiness of stews and soups cooked during this time of year.

I still wonder what America would look like if Starbucks made debuted a sweet potato latte instead of a pumpkin one. Anybody else? Maybe not. Is it only weird to me that we drink pumpkins?

Well, pumpkin is no stranger to my family’s Thanksgiving smorgasbord. From pies to custards, whether baked, boiled, or roasted, it makes an appearance in some form or fashion between October and December.

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I recently shared a picture on IG but didn’t share the recipe. Rookie mistake, sorry fam. Without further delay,

Skillet Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Bread

What you need:
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons pumpkin spice
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup dairy-free butter, room temperature (not melted)
3/4 cup raw brown sugar
1 chia “egg” (1 tablespoon chia seeds and 1 ½ tablespoon water, let sit for 5 minutes)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie filling)
1 ½ cups of dark chocolate chips, chunks, or chopped

What to do:
Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F.
In a large bowl, gently whisk the flour, pumpkin spice, baking soda, and salt.
Using an electric mixer, combine the butter and sugar. Mix on medium-high until ingredients creamed together.
Add chia egg, vanilla and pumpkin to wet mixture until combined.
Add dry ingredients into the wet ingredients until combined. Do not over mix.
Stir in 1 cup of chocolate chips.
Pour mixture into cast iron skillet leaving at least 1/4” inch at the top of the pan for rising. (If the skillet is well-seasoned, you will not need to grease it).
Smooth out mixture and sprinkle on the remaining 1/2 cup chocolate chips.
Bake for 35-40 minutes. Remove from the oven and leave in skillet to cool.

Enjoy!

❤ Krystal

ramblings on food recreation and thanksgiving.

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Entering this season of Thanksgiving, I realize how thankful I am for much in my life.  This year has taken me to so many new places and has exposed me to so many new experiences; I will forever be grateful.

I was reading an article today (read: not my revolution) which made me realize how thankful I am for food.

Now, hear me out.

In my world, I am able to go to the store and buy food I need to make it day-to-day. Sometimes, I even buy food I want and food I don’t need. I buy food to try, just for the sake of trying it. On most days, I have extra food in my shelves. Even on my most intentional days, I still waste more food than I should.

I can easily take hundreds of pictures of my food before I consume it, share it with friends, or freeze it for later.

In my world, food is first: a source of recreation, and second: a source of sustenance.

I think it’s easy to incorrectly filter my reality for everyone’s reality. I hope that these lessons will continue to push me to be thankful and giving in everything I do.

If you are going into the field of nutrition, I implore you to stay woke (I’ve been gone since 2016, hope I used that right) on nutrition topics, movements, and the know. I think it’s important to read about many nutrition topics, (even when you don’t agree with them). I try to stay abreast on new diets, MLM brands, supplements, cleanses, etc., in order to find evidence-based approaches to support or deny methods. Quickly, one can observe the demographics of these product consumers and easily see the divide between food as recreation and food as sustenance, which I mention above.

To be fair, having margin to buy food for food photography puts me in the same boat.  This article convicted me on so many levels. I could seriously go on and on.

While this time of year makes many of us more cognizant to give back and be thankful, I challenge each of you to make it a daily habit.

❤ Krystal

mango shrimp tacos.

Originally posted: July 24, 2013

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Since I am getting more clicks on my camera, I’ve been wanting to update my recipe pictures from years gone by. Part of the reason I stopped posting recipes is because my pictures just couldn’t hang with the many food bloggers out there, and learning photography was a daunting for me.

Well, here I am.

Mango Shrimp Tacos

Taco filling:
1 tablespoon olive oil
15-20 medium shrimp, thawed, peeled, tails removed
1 small red onion, diced
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1 large jalapeno pepper, diced
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 romaine lettuce leaves, rinsed and dried
1 large ripe mango, peeled and diced in 1/4″ chunks (I ate most of my mango before it made it to a taco, whoops)
1/2 cup lightly packed fresh cilantro leaves, chopped and de-stemmed

Sauce:
1/4 cup Greek yogurt
2 tablespoons lime juice (fresh is best)
1/4 teaspoon salt

Stir together Greek yogurt, lime juice and salt. Set aside.

Add olive oil to a 10-inch non-stick skillet. On medium heat, saute shrimp, onion, ginger, jalapeno and salt until shrimp is cooked. This should not take long, about 6-7 minutes. Remove and set aside.

Place about 6-8 chunks of mango evenly over each lettuce leaf, then top with 1/4 of the shrimp mixture. If you’re one of the lucky ones to which cilantro doesn’t taste like soap, sprinkle on top.

Drizzle each taco with yogurt sauce.

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Happy National Taco Day!

❤ Krystal

super cao nguyen.

Some of us may never have the opportunity to travel abroad to enjoy international cuisines. Fortunately, in a world of increasing globalization, food is no longer isolated to its place of origin and can spread across all borders.

Super Cao Nguyen is located in the heart of the Asian District of Oklahoma City. It is the largest international grocer in Oklahoma City and was opened by Vietnamese refugees, Tri and Kim Luong. While the shelves here are filled with many Vietnamese kitchen staples, foods from all over the world can be found here.

After living and traveling overseas, I am not a stranger to the sights and sounds of international markets. While I currently don’t have a car, I enjoyed venturing away from my typical grocery store routine to check out more varied and seemingly fresher food options.

Super Cao Nguyen opens at 9am on weekdays. At opening time, employees are seen going through their normal routines of spray washing, stocking shelves, and prepping ready-to-go meals for the day. As you walk through the doors, you are greeted with the aromatic scents of incenses and a bright display of floral arrangments and traditional festive decor.

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I love signs like this that straight up, tell it like it is. The meat department cuts fresh fish and meat daily. Fresh salmon steaks on this particular day were $6.99 per pound.

In Mandarin, this dish is called zongzi. Zongzi is a traditional Chinese rice dish made of glutinous rice stuffed with different fillings and wrapped in bamboo leaves. They are cooked by steaming or boiling. Throughout Asia, there are different variations of this dish.

I am pretty adventurous when it comes to trying different foods, although I like to try international foods with someone with ties to a particular region (so I know if the food is actually good).

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I was on the hunt for two items, but only I found one. The first was purple sweet potatoes, which I could not find this time. The second was the matcha green tea Kit-Kat bars. Which I gladly purchased a bag of, because no shopping trip is complete without sweets.

❤ Krystal

pumpkin spice nice cream

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It’s PSL season, y’all.

While I am thankful to be back in the US where I can witness each season change, I am not quite ready to give up my summer favorites such as fresh berries and the most quintessential treat of the summer…ice cream.

I’m finally catching on to this new wave of nice cream. (I think I will be saying this for awhile to all the trends I missed out on from 2016 until now). By the way, I am not bringing bell-bottoms back. Props to those of you who are. I can’t. I just can’t.

Anyhow, nice cream is a great rendition on ice cream, if you couldn’t guess that much. While, I have nothing against ice cream, I don’t have a car, and ice cream doesn’t travel well from my local store to my house by foot.

Nice cream is simple and you will be amazed by 1) how easy it is to make,  2) the taste 3) and  the texture.

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Want to make your own pumpkin spice nice cream?

2 bananas*, peeled, chopped and frozen
1/2 – 3/4 c of canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
2 teaspoons of pumpkin spice (I made my own)
1/2 c of milk (you can use plant-based or dairy)
1 oz of cold brew coffee (because cold brew is the most millennial thing to do)

Add all ingredients to your blender or food processor, and scrape down the sides when needed. You should end up with a beautiful, soft serve consistency.

*You want ripe bananas, but not “banana bread” ripe. Use bananas that have some brown spots, but are still firm.

Note: Peel your bananas before freezing.

I think next time I will add my cold brew affogato-style.

Enjoy.

❤ Krystal

i’m home.

I hope you haven’t taken my absence from Moving Wright Along too personal.

On May 24, 2018, I said my “see you laters,” to friends, family, and colleagues in my village in Namibia. It’s crazy to believe that two years of my life came and went just like that. I can vividly remember my first night in my community. I sat down on my bed in my new home and had an “oh sh*t” moment. What had I done? To say I am so happy to have completed my Peace Corps service is an understatement because there were many times and many reasons I wanted to book the next flight home.

After a “treat yo self” mini vacay in Johannesburg, South Africa (I hope to post about that soon), on May 29, I hauled 80 pounds of my most valuable Namibian possessions and traveled 8,000 miles over the Atlantic Ocean, back to Philly. Ironically, where my entire Peace Corps journey began.

I surprised my family by arriving a week earlier than they expected. That was FUN!

As you can imagine, Moving Wright Along will no longer be a place where I talk about my Peace Corps service. I will, however, archive my Peace Corps service posts for y’all (once I figure out how to do that and not clutter this space).

As many of you know, I have been accepted into the Nutrition and Food Science Graduate Program at UCO. In a few short weeks, I will begin the final leg of my journey to becoming a Registered Dietitian. While I have taken a longer route than most it was the (w)right one. (You see what I did!)

I can’t wait to share my graduate school life with you on Moving Wright Along, as well as all my Trader Joe’s and Aldi hauls on IG. I considered starting a new blog and site for my nutrition journey, but I have branded myself with my blog, and letsbehonest… it’s a pretty good name.

So, if you are interested in hearing me talk about food, food, and more food, please stick around and share my blog with friends and family.

❤ Krystal

down by the river.

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The Kavango River: separating Namibia from Angola.

It still amazes me how different the landscapes are as you travel through Namibia. This weekend I spent some time in Rundu. I knew I was getting closer to town when I saw vivid green foliage, traces of water from recent heavy rains, and elephant crossing signs. Yes, seriously. I live in a country where elephants and people can cross paths (although, it wouldn’t be a great idea). How crazy is that?

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One of the many beautiful peacocks roaming around Camp YEAH over the weekend.

Each year volunteers in the Kavango Region host Camp YEAH. YEAH stands for Youth Exploring and Achieving in Health. The camp focuses on educating youth about the risk of HIV/AIDS and other issues affecting youth such as teen pregnancy. Volunteers and counterparts select motivated learners from their communities to participate.

This year, we will be introducing this camp to Ovamboland, creatively rebranding the name to Camp O-YEAH. Camp O-YEAH will be held during the first week of May. I have been put in charge of getting all the kitchen/nutrition stuff in order for camp. Since this is my first time being on the operations side of any camp, I figured this was a great opportunity to check out Camp YEAH, but also see how a camp kitchen is run.

When I completed my dietetics degree, I never thought I would use any food management concepts again. Not because I would never need to, but because I never wanted to EVER again. (Never say never, my friends!) I fell in love with the community health aspect of dietetics, and not so much with the food management or clinical side of it. Dietetic professionals know that creating menus to feed the masses takes a lot of time, math, tears, and preparation. Move to Namibia and add in converting everything from US to metric, and it turns into one heck of a good time.

I watched as a team of two volunteers with the assistance of a few locals cook and serve three meals per day to approximately 50 campers and staff. I was thoroughly impressed and mostly relieved that some school kitchens in Namibia are equipped with appliances found in commercial kitchens in the States. (They had a tilt skillet, y’all).

Mariah and Winnie cooked and introduced delicious new foods to the campers while reminding volunteers of the yummy foods we sacrificed for two years.

 

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Delicious cheese…oh, and chili.

 

For me, planning six days, 17 meals including 5 tea breaks, and 50 expected attendees will make anyone want to pull their hair out, but I think it will turn out just fine.

 

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Speaking of hair, do you like my new style? Can’t beat a new look for $10 USD.

 

❤ Krystal