letter home – july 2017.

Another month has come and gone! July was a pretty exciting one.

I posted quite a bit on my blog this month, so if you haven’t read it lately, check it out. Also, the beginning of August marks the single month countdown until COS (close of service). Wow! Doesn’t even seem possible, but it is.

So, July, July, July (insert Decemberist, here). We had our 4th of July braai. That was fun. I also planned it, so it was nice that everything went according to plan.

Then, I went to Etosha. That is also on my blog. 🙂 (I have learned to schedule my blogs to auto-post, since my wifi is unpredictable). So, I am not actually sitting at my computer all day and night, like it may seem.

Peace Corps Namibia’s Media Committee paid a visit to my site for 5-days late-July to film for an impact video which will be posted in the next couple months. The Media Committee is comprised of volunteers throughout Namibia who create media to spotlight PC Namibia to the rest of Peace Corps. Many Peace Corps post (countries) have media committees. It was really fun to have them follow me along. Many of the MC volunteers are town volunteers. There seems to be a feud between the town and village volunteers. Mostly about the have-nots and the have-nothings. lol. All volunteers have their challenges, but it was nice for them to see what some may call “The Peace Corps Experience.” In many ways, my PC experience is what many volunteers envision when they apply. So, the “townies” totally soaked up the village-life for a few days. My host family and colleagues welcomed them with open arms by providing meals, transport, and new skills to take back to their town-life. (Although, we didn’t kill a chicken this time.)

I can’t wait for the final cut of the video to be posted, but it was a magical experience. Stars aligned during those 5-days and everything worked out with projects, people, etc. (ok, maybe having a camera crew helped), but it was great.

I know it seems opposite to think or say, but it really was a humbling experience. I’m really fortunate for the community I have been placed in (warts and all). I had a heart-to-heart with Vern. He’s a newer business volunteer to the country. He’s retired military with over 30 years of working experience. I sat down to talk to him during one of our lulls through the week. I was able to tell him about challenges I have encountered throughout my last year. I have had many frustrations (some I have told you about) and times where I wanted to be home, close to friends, family, and colleagues who appreciate my hard work and effort. I know now that without my community, I am nothing. Being a Peace Corps Volunteer means absolutely nothing without a community. I have been blessed to have a community that cares for me and takes care of me in absence of my family back home.

There never is really a “failed” project, it’s just a project that is not fit for a community at this time. There always seems to be new projects that arise in failures.

So, now my weekly schedule consists of the health club, exercise group, mentoring Victoria, and community health outreach (checking BP, weight and health education) in the community. Still waiting to hear back from the Ministry about a secure meeting space to host our teen HIV support group. Fingers crossed.

Anyhow, more personal fun stuff:

  • I have almost finished all 10 seasons of Friends. Season 8 is by far the funniest, in my opinion
  • I finished reading Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and I am currently reading Wild, The Blind Side, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and BIG TEAM, a leadership book written by one of my friends I worked with at Chesapeake.
  • Started on 2017 table cloth embroidering (slowly, but surely).
  • I’m in a wedding this weekend. My bridesmaid dress is blue and I’m somehow supposed to wear 3-inch heels in the sand, oh boy.

August means another school break is in store, and I will be spending the last week of the month hiking Fish River Canyon with some volunteers.

Also, Camp GLOW will take place during the last week of August. If you would like to still donate for that please do so here: https://donate.peacecorps.gov/donate/project/camp-glow-namibia-2017/

I added a lot of pictures this time. I figured wherever you’re reading this, you have better internet than I do, so this won’t take all day to load.

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At the end of each month, there is a pension day. Eligible elderly go to pick up their pension checks. One that same day, there is usually a market setup in front of the clinic and sell goods such as brooms, shoes, baskets and they even butcher meat. It’s like a one-stop shop for people who travel long distances from their village. This picture is with the ladies who were selling N$5 avocados. ($1 USD= N$13). I don’t even really like avocados, but you can’t beat that price anywhere. Photo Credit: Peace Corps Namibia Media Committee

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Me and Ms.Frieda, she’s the principal at the secondary school and one of my friends in Namibia. Photo Credit: Peace Corps Namibia Media Committee

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A few of my colleagues at the clinic- Josephine and Pehevelo. (The shack looking thing in the back, is actually an outdoor kitchen, called an epata, it is covered to protect from the rain in the rainy season. Oh, and when I say kitchen, it’s literally just a few stones on the ground to hold your pot for cooking over an open fire.) Photo Credit: Peace Corps Namibia Media Committee

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Passing out some more teddy bears at the kindergarten across from the clinic. I think I was dancing in that photo. Why was I dancing? Photo Credit: Peace Corps Namibia Media Committee

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Washing clothes. Yep, hand-washing. I learned from the “townies” that some of them actually wear gloves to hand-wash their clothes. It’s really not that bad, just time consuming. Okay, I actually hate it, but my host family usually helps me and I offer a few dollars or sweets in return. Photo Credit: Peace Corps Namibia Media Committee

I wanted to send this email tomorrow, but with my luck with Wifi, I figured I would send it now now.
Have a wonderful week!

letter home – march/april/may 2017.

Hello All—-

I haven’t forgotten about you! I have been both busy and not busy at the same time. How is that even possibly?

In March, I joined a couple Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) and a Namibian friend to Cape Town, South Africa for a relaxing vacation and we also attended PRIDE. Recently, Peace Corps Namibia, with the overwhelming support of former Global Peace Corps Director, Carrie Hessler-Radelet (I met her last July), formed Diversity Resource Partners (DRP). As you can imagine, PCVs join Peace Corps during all stages in their lives. From recently college grads to retirees and many volunteers in between. Serving as a black American volunteer has its challenges, including times where I must “prove” my Americaness and ability to do things as well or even better than white Americans, of course considering my skills and knowledge. While this remains my main struggle during service, many other volunteers face challenges in being open about their religious beliefs, sexual orientation, political affiliations, etc., which can make it a very lonely place for a volunteer. We created DRP to provide a place for volunteers to connect and have a place to address these challenges and provide a sounding board in how to deal with challenges (respectfully and tastefully) in our communities (with other volunteers and our actually Namibian communities). This has definitely been the one time in my life that I have truly thought about my physical identity on a daily basis, whether people are giving me the run around because I don’t appear American enough for them, to subtleties such as watching a cashier hand a fellow volunteer their change while placing their left hand on their right elbow (a sign of respect) and that same cashier sliding my change to me on the counter, or having an HCN approach a group of volunteers and shake everyone’s hand except for mine, are moments that are hard to shake and leave a lasting impression. I can’t say most days I thought about that in the States. DRP provides a place for me to talk about these challenges so they don’t eat me up inside.

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I also made a trip home in March. I’m kinda regretting it now. It just made me miss home too much. I loved seeing everyone while I was home, don’t get me wrong. I also have overall enjoyed my time here, but it just makes it easier to be homesick thinking of the things I am missing out on now to be here. But, in the same ways, one year passed so quickly, I expect my last year of service to be the same. I made a Facebook post recently about things I missed in the States. Thinking back, it was such a superficial list. My best friend, Carrie Hooton, challenged me by responding, “Things I miss by not going to Namibia: (Krys fill this in, top 7)”, CHALLENGE ACCEPTED. Blog post in the works.

April was filled with meetings and lots of transitioning in Peace Corps Namibia. My last email I talked about struggles of the health program. All of the health volunteers were invited to Windhoek (pronounced Wind hook or Vind hook), for a 3-day conference on restructuring the program. Unfortunately, due to continuous staff changes, and lack of support and partnership with the Ministry of Health, being a health volunteer has been, I’ll just say it, HARD!!! Many of us are in clinics in rural villages where English is not spoken or spoken well. So, when a PCVs shows up, the clinics see us as if we’re creating more work, as opposed to helping to alleviate it (even though these clinics have agreed in advance to host a volunteer). So, many volunteers have to be extremely creative and flexible. From the meeting, we were able to come to a consensus of what a true health volunteers role should be and not only that, we suggested new ways recruit volunteers to Namibia because the current application was in some ways misleading.

At the end of April, I was involved in the first Camp O-YEAH in my region. Because of my food science background, I was pretty much the camp cook. Josie knows, I hated food management! My food management rotation literally brought me to tears. Well, I ended up planning the menu for a 5-day health camp- including requisition, recipes, menu, and the US to metric conversions! Most meals turned out great. Campers were happy as well as the facilitators. The campers were able to try new foods that they don’t eat at home, and let’s just say, EVERYONE LOVES TACO TUESDAYS!

During the month of May, the schools were on holiday. The schools here are year-round (somewhat), so there are month-long breaks during May and December. I didn’t have much planned, so the principal at the secondary school, Ms. Elago, invited me to her home for a few days. It was nice to get away for awhile. We relaxed, picked lemons from her lemon tree, and talked about projects for the upcoming term. I did make another trip to Rundu located in northeast Namibia, for the going away party of the group who arrived in Namibia a year before me. My friend, Steffi, was a business volunteer in Namibia. Recently, NPR did a fantastic reflective piece on her service, you should read it! She’s heading to NYU in the fall.

Next weekend, I am heading to Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe to run a 7.5K (it was only R45~ $3.50 USD). I am probably going to bungee jump, Mom. Just be warned now. Then, later this month, my cohort group meets for our Mid-service conference, marking our one year at our sites.

I hope this email blast wasn’t full of complaints. I mean, like always I take the good with the bad, and that’s normal for any job, whether it’s brewing my life away at Starbucks or roughing it while trying to balance cross-cultural interactions. Some days are good, some days are challenging. The most important thing is learning from each experience, amiright?

Books I’ve read this year (I am always open for suggestions):
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, JK Rowlings
We Should All be Feminist, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Columbine, Dave Cullen
The Magnolia Story, Chip and Joanna Gaines
The Art of Non-Conformity: Set Your Own Rules, Live the Life You Want, and Change the World, Chris Gulliebeau
Push, Sapphire
Power Lines: Two Years on South Africa’s Borders, Jason Carter
Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood, Trevor Noah

Do I like reading? I don’t know. But, after reading some of the books I’ve read in the last year, I am convinced I could write a book about my life and sell a lot of copies.

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I met the Minister of Health, Dr. Bernard Haufiku. He came to the health camp and spoke with the youth. He is an intelligent man and so kind. Invited us to his house from dinner the following evening. In US terms, this was like meeting the Surgeon General of the US.

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I took a photo of a taxi rank, where you should haul a taxi from, but this is not the reality. I still hate hiking in this country!

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I have a roommate, it’s a mouse and it likes to eat my produce.

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Rainy season is over and everything is dry and dead, again!

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We harvested all of our mahangu for the year, the kids are using sticks to get the grain off of the reeds.

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Our dog, Brownie, had 13 puppies two weeks ago, I haven’t decided if I am keeping one yet.

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I passed out some bears at a local kindergarten. Bears were donated by the Mother Bear Project. If you know how to crochet or knit and want to find a way to put a smile on a child’s face, check out their website.

a year in review.

Finally, I did it. I started a blog. I have been telling myself for some time now that I really wanted to start a blog, but the fact that I don’t always feel interesting enough for people to want to read about has always steered me away. As I made a list of my goals for 2013, starting a blog made the cut (once again). So, without further delay. Here goes it.

I will begin with my Christmas letter of 2012. I think that’s a good place to start. Giving you all a little background of what you’re getting yourselves into.

So, I’ve always wanted to send out Christmas letters, but I really don’t do things that are all that “letter worthy”. Especially not anything to send out during the holiday season. My idea of Christmas letters were always more of the “let-me-tell-you-all-the-cool-stuff-I-did-this-year-so-you-can-be-jealous” letters. I really, really, wanted to avoid that. So, I decided to do something a little different and fun. I wanted to include as many friends in my letter as possible to make it more of a letter of things I have done with people I love, and not just a “look at me”. I hope you like it.

CHRISTMAS LETTER