down by the river.

20170227_232848.jpg

The Kavango River: separating Namibia from Angola.

It still amazes me how different the landscapes are as you travel through Namibia. This weekend I spent some time in Rundu. I knew I was getting closer to town when I saw vivid green foliage, traces of water from recent heavy rains, and elephant crossing signs. Yes, seriously. I live in a country where elephants and people can cross paths (although, it wouldn’t be a great idea). How crazy is that?

20170227_232946.jpg

One of the many beautiful peacocks roaming around Camp YEAH over the weekend.

Each year volunteers in the Kavango Region host Camp YEAH. YEAH stands for Youth Exploring and Achieving in Health. The camp focuses on educating youth about the risk of HIV/AIDS and other issues affecting youth such as teen pregnancy. Volunteers and counterparts select motivated learners from their communities to participate.

This year, we will be introducing this camp to Ovamboland, creatively rebranding the name to Camp O-YEAH. Camp O-YEAH will be held during the first week of May. I have been put in charge of getting all the kitchen/nutrition stuff in order for camp. Since this is my first time being on the operations side of any camp, I figured this was a great opportunity to check out Camp YEAH, but also see how a camp kitchen is run.

When I completed my dietetics degree, I never thought I would use any food management concepts again. Not because I would never need to, but because I never wanted to EVER again. (Never say never, my friends!) I fell in love with the community health aspect of dietetics, and not so much with the food management or clinical side of it. Dietetic professionals know that creating menus to feed the masses takes a lot of time, math, tears, and preparation. Move to Namibia and add in converting everything from US to metric, and it turns into one heck of a good time.

I watched as a team of two volunteers with the assistance of a few locals cook and serve three meals per day to approximately 50 campers and staff. I was thoroughly impressed and mostly relieved that some school kitchens in Namibia are equipped with appliances found in commercial kitchens in the States. (They had a tilt skillet, y’all).

Mariah and Winnie cooked and introduced delicious new foods to the campers while reminding volunteers of the yummy foods we sacrificed for two years.

 

wp-1488277991617.jpg

Delicious cheese…oh, and chili.

 

For me, planning six days, 17 meals including 5 tea breaks, and 50 expected attendees will make anyone want to pull their hair out, but I think it will turn out just fine.

 

20170227_232714.jpg

Speaking of hair, do you like my new style? Can’t beat a new look for $10 USD.

 

❤ Krystal

 

coconut & avocado oil deep conditioner.

After all these years of being natural, I finally realized my main curly girl dilemma. It has been my battle with properly conditioning. When I first BC’d (big chopped) my hair, wash-n-gos were a way of life. They required very little maintenance. As my hair has grown, I’ve found it more and more difficult to maintain length. Mostly because I am stuck in the wash-n-go way of life. This month during my 30 Day Challenge, I have been discovering new ways to care for my hair. Including new styling, washing, and conditioning methods.

Coconut Milk & Avocado Oil Deep Conditioner adapted from my new favorite curly girl Naija Curls
1- can full fat coconut milk
1- 2 tablespoons of avocado oil

Whisk well. Refrigerate overnight.
Divide hair into four sections.
Apply conditioner from root to tip of hair, twisting sections as you go.
Wrap hair in shower cap and towel for 30 minutes up to overnight.
Rinse hair by sections.

Style in desired protective style.

Flat Twists

Still working on my protective stylings, but here’s a start.
❤ Krystal

natural hair: bantu knots

It’s 2014, and with a new year, I’m trying to be a little more outgoing with hair styles. Simply not having enough time should no longer be an excuse, especially when it comes to bantu knots. This style is probably the easiest natural hair style I’ve done so far, and from my experience, I love the results.

To all you curly girls with too much length for TWA, but not much length to do more than a wash n’go, this could be your solution.

Simply, part damp, moisturized (I use raw shea butter) hair into sections. The way I achieved the style pictured is by first sectioning hair and doing two-strand twist. After completing each twist, I twirled each twist until it naturally curled up into a knot, tucking the end under.

Leave knots in until hair is completely dry. Carefully, undo twist. Unwrapping each twist. I learned if you just pull twist apart, this will cause a lot of frizz. 

Achieve your finally style playing around with parts, accessories, and front twist.