nutritionist vs dietitian.

As if nutrition isn’t confusing enough already. Where you get your nutrition advice from can be just as confusing and sometimes harmful.

All dietitians are nutritionists, but not all nutritionists are dietitians.

What is a Nutritionist?

A nutritionist can be anyone.

Anyone who claims knowledge of nutrition at any level can call themselves a nutritionist.

Anyone with or without sound knowledge or understanding of dietetics, which includes the study of macro and micronutrients, anatomy & physiology, etiology of disease, prenatal and pediatric nutrition, tube feeds, fluid-restricted diets, the lifecycles of aging and its effects on nutritional status and intake, not to mention, nutrition assessments,
nutrition counseling, interventions, monitoring and evaluating [holy run-on sentence] can call themselves a nutritionist.

Quite frankly, there is so much more!

While I do believe nutritionists can offer a lot to the conversation of nutrition, many fail to recognize dietetics fully. From my experience, nutritionists tend to be primarily weight-loss focused, and honestly, weight is not everyone’s health problem.

While some nutritionists may be degreed, they are not required to complete training or internships to hold their title. An increasing number of nutritionists do not have degrees or certifications in nutrition, health, dietetics or any related field.

What is a Registered Dietitian?

A Registered Dietitian or Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RD or RDN) is a protected title accredited by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND).

The Academy is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. It’s comprised of students, educators, researchers, retired and international members who help in constructing, advising, advocating, and influencing food networks, nutrition therapy, and food policies.

So, if you eat (which if you’re living, you probably do), The Academy and its members play the largest role in improving and advancing the food and nutrition industry.

To become a Registered Dietitian, one must:

  1. Have at least a bachelor’s degree in nutrition, although many have higher degrees.
  2. Complete 1200 hours of supervised practicum, commonly referred to as a dietetic internship or DI for short- many DIs are unpaid rotations in clinical, community, and food service settings.
  3. Pass the national RD exam which consists of at least 125 questions about the Principles of Dietetics, Nutrition Care for Individuals and Groups, Management of Food and Nutrition Programs and Services, and Foodservice Systems.

Beginning in 2024, ALL RDs will be required to have a master’s degree in addition to the three REQUIREMENTS listed above.

In most states, Oklahoma included, RDs must also become licensed under the state medical board in order to practice.

This post is not to discourage nutritionist is doing their thing, but to enlighten those practicing nutrition how important it is to vet evidence-based information.

Some people may be under the false pretense that registered dietitians or those becoming dietitians spend years studying fad diets. With the blatant, “stay in your lane,” mentality, now more than ever, staying abreast of fad diets is now part of the job. Misinformation is so harmful to public health.

Now, lemme go eat my pasta!

❤ Krystal

tips on saving money while in graduate school

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As most of you all know, higher education is not cheap. Even with assistance through fellowships, scholarships, assistantships, and even loans, expenses still occur here and there. When most of our time is in the classroom, it can impact the ability to save or earn money.

While I’m no expert, I have a few tips on what I have done to save a dime or two during graduate school.

tip number one)

Review your menu.

I know what you’re thinking, “Yeah, really?! Thanks a lot. [insert eye roll]”

While I love to eat out I have realized that a lot of my budget outside of education is spent on food. With food delivery apps making food available within a matter of minutes, consider the cost of convenience compared to cooking at home. Even simple meal prep delivery services can add up if you don’t eat the food before it goes bad.

By now, you should know, my favorite store is Aldi. I also have a Neighborhood Walmart within walking distance. Once a month, I make my “major” shopping trip to Aldi and stock up on produce, dried and canned goods, and snacks. And once a week or as needed, I can walk to the Neighborhood Walmart to get a few items here and there when they run out.

During the week, stress and a shortage of time may interfere with cooking meals. I try to cook a few meals ahead of time. That ranges from actually preparing an entree or two for the week or even just cutting up all my vegetables for ease of adding them to a salad or meal. Another big money saver for me is not purchasing meat. I am not a vegetarian. I like to eat what tastes good. Meat is an expensive protein source compared to other great foods such as vegetables, beans, and legumes. I am cooking-for-one on most days, so I can’t justify spending the money on meat, especially when it’s not the first food I reach for to satisfy my hunger.

(I save the meat purchasing for when hubby is in town.

Oh, by the way, I got married! I’ll blog about that later.

Tip number two)

Find a JOB

Okay, this tip is less about saving and more about acquiring money.

Find a full-time or part-time job in your field of interest, or just find something. There are so many contract jobs that can fit around your schedule. I know company’s like Lyft, let you rent a car if you don’t have one, to drive for them.

If your schedule allows it. Work from home! I have been very fortunate to start teaching online with VIPKID. My mornings start early around 5 or 6 a.m. I’m able to choose my schedule that works around my class schedule which has been really nice. I try to only teach on days I don’t have class. The income helps to cover some expenses such as food and rent and incidentals (and the wedding we planned in 45 days). But, it’s best to find something flexible around any exams, research assignments, study groups, or school engagements.

tip number three)

Cut cable and internet cost wherever you can. I think many of us have cut these cords a while ago. While I do have Wi-Fi at home, I don’t feel the need to have a top of the line package because I also live two blocks from campus. I’m essentially a stone’s throw away from free Wi-Fi.

I also decided to invest in a TV antenna instead of Netflix or Hulu. I only HAVE one show…”This Is Us” and that is pretty much the only time I turn on my television. It made more sense to me to spend roughly $17 on a TV antenna instead of paying for a plan ranging from $8 to $16 a month to watch one show a week.

tip number four)

Walk. Walk. Walk. Many grad students commute but if you live within walking distance, consider saving a few bucks and walk or ride your bike to class. My school also has a program where you can borrow a bike for a semester. I am rarely, if ever, late to class because I don’t have to worry about finding a parking spot which I hear is a pain in the butt on my campus.

tip number five)

Shop discount, resale or used. I have purchased most of my textbooks, clothing, and even apartment decor secondhand. Amazon Warehouse is a pretty good option, although sometimes it is a miss. Retail therapy is not a great coping mechanism to have in graduate school (or life in general).

Poshmark (earn $5 by signing up using my code KRYSTALWRIGHT25), ThredUp, Goodwill or even a local thrift store in your area is a good place to look for affordable brand name clothes for pennies on the dollar. I’ve found brands such as Anthropologie, Express, Banana Republic, and even designer brands for fractions of the retail price. Important to keep this in mind as you are preparing your research presentations and even a job interview.

Simple office and household goods can be purchased at a discount on Amazon Warehouse. I purchased two-reams of printer paper for under $3 per ream on Amazon Warehouse, discounted only because the packaging was ripped.

Happy Saving!

❤ Krystal

ramblings on food recreation and thanksgiving.

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Entering this season of Thanksgiving, I realize how thankful I am for much in my life.  This year has taken me to so many new places and has exposed me to so many new experiences; I will forever be grateful.

I was reading an article today (read: not my revolution) which made me realize how thankful I am for food.

Now, hear me out.

In my world, I am able to go to the store and buy food I need to make it day-to-day. Sometimes, I even buy food I want and food I don’t need. I buy food to try, just for the sake of trying it. On most days, I have extra food in my shelves. Even on my most intentional days, I still waste more food than I should.

I can easily take hundreds of pictures of my food before I consume it, share it with friends, or freeze it for later.

In my world, food is first: a source of recreation, and second: a source of sustenance.

I think it’s easy to incorrectly filter my reality for everyone’s reality. I hope that these lessons will continue to push me to be thankful and giving in everything I do.

If you are going into the field of nutrition, I implore you to stay woke (I’ve been gone since 2016, hope I used that right) on nutrition topics, movements, and the know. I think it’s important to read about many nutrition topics, (even when you don’t agree with them). I try to stay abreast on new diets, MLM brands, supplements, cleanses, etc., in order to find evidence-based approaches to support or deny methods. Quickly, one can observe the demographics of these product consumers and easily see the divide between food as recreation and food as sustenance, which I mention above.

To be fair, having margin to buy food for food photography puts me in the same boat.  This article convicted me on so many levels. I could seriously go on and on.

While this time of year makes many of us more cognizant to give back and be thankful, I challenge each of you to make it a daily habit.

❤ Krystal

mango shrimp tacos.

Originally posted: July 24, 2013

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Since I am getting more clicks on my camera, I’ve been wanting to update my recipe pictures from years gone by. Part of the reason I stopped posting recipes is because my pictures just couldn’t hang with the many food bloggers out there, and learning photography was a daunting for me.

Well, here I am.

Mango Shrimp Tacos

Taco filling:
1 tablespoon olive oil
15-20 medium shrimp, thawed, peeled, tails removed
1 small red onion, diced
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1 large jalapeno pepper, diced
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 romaine lettuce leaves, rinsed and dried
1 large ripe mango, peeled and diced in 1/4″ chunks (I ate most of my mango before it made it to a taco, whoops)
1/2 cup lightly packed fresh cilantro leaves, chopped and de-stemmed

Sauce:
1/4 cup Greek yogurt
2 tablespoons lime juice (fresh is best)
1/4 teaspoon salt

Stir together Greek yogurt, lime juice and salt. Set aside.

Add olive oil to a 10-inch non-stick skillet. On medium heat, saute shrimp, onion, ginger, jalapeno and salt until shrimp is cooked. This should not take long, about 6-7 minutes. Remove and set aside.

Place about 6-8 chunks of mango evenly over each lettuce leaf, then top with 1/4 of the shrimp mixture. If you’re one of the lucky ones to which cilantro doesn’t taste like soap, sprinkle on top.

Drizzle each taco with yogurt sauce.

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Happy National Taco Day!

❤ Krystal

pumpkin spice nice cream

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It’s PSL season, y’all.

While I am thankful to be back in the US where I can witness each season change, I am not quite ready to give up my summer favorites such as fresh berries and the most quintessential treat of the summer…ice cream.

I’m finally catching on to this new wave of nice cream. (I think I will be saying this for awhile to all the trends I missed out on from 2016 until now). By the way, I am not bringing bell-bottoms back. Props to those of you who are. I can’t. I just can’t.

Anyhow, nice cream is a great rendition on ice cream, if you couldn’t guess that much. While, I have nothing against ice cream, I don’t have a car, and ice cream doesn’t travel well from my local store to my house by foot.

Nice cream is simple and you will be amazed by 1) how easy it is to make,  2) the taste 3) and  the texture.

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Want to make your own pumpkin spice nice cream?

2 bananas*, peeled, chopped and frozen
1/2 – 3/4 c of canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
2 teaspoons of pumpkin spice (I made my own)
1/2 c of milk (you can use plant-based or dairy)
1 oz of cold brew coffee (because cold brew is the most millennial thing to do)

Add all ingredients to your blender or food processor, and scrape down the sides when needed. You should end up with a beautiful, soft serve consistency.

*You want ripe bananas, but not “banana bread” ripe. Use bananas that have some brown spots, but are still firm.

Note: Peel your bananas before freezing.

I think next time I will add my cold brew affogato-style.

Enjoy.

❤ Krystal

i’m home.

I hope you haven’t taken my absence from Moving Wright Along too personal.

On May 24, 2018, I said my “see you laters,” to friends, family, and colleagues in my village in Namibia. It’s crazy to believe that two years of my life came and went just like that. I can vividly remember my first night in my community. I sat down on my bed in my new home and had an “oh sh*t” moment. What had I done? To say I am so happy to have completed my Peace Corps service is an understatement because there were many times and many reasons I wanted to book the next flight home.

After a “treat yo self” mini vacay in Johannesburg, South Africa (I hope to post about that soon), on May 29, I hauled 80 pounds of my most valuable Namibian possessions and traveled 8,000 miles over the Atlantic Ocean, back to Philly. Ironically, where my entire Peace Corps journey began.

I surprised my family by arriving a week earlier than they expected. That was FUN!

As you can imagine, Moving Wright Along will no longer be a place where I talk about my Peace Corps service. I will, however, archive my Peace Corps service posts for y’all (once I figure out how to do that and not clutter this space).

As many of you know, I have been accepted into the Nutrition and Food Science Graduate Program at UCO. In a few short weeks, I will begin the final leg of my journey to becoming a Registered Dietitian. While I have taken a longer route than most it was the (w)right one. (You see what I did!)

I can’t wait to share my graduate school life with you on Moving Wright Along, as well as all my Trader Joe’s and Aldi hauls on IG. I considered starting a new blog and site for my nutrition journey, but I have branded myself with my blog, and letsbehonest… it’s a pretty good name.

So, if you are interested in hearing me talk about food, food, and more food, please stick around and share my blog with friends and family.

❤ Krystal

down by the river.

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The Kavango River: separating Namibia from Angola.

It still amazes me how different the landscapes are as you travel through Namibia. This weekend I spent some time in Rundu. I knew I was getting closer to town when I saw vivid green foliage, traces of water from recent heavy rains, and elephant crossing signs. Yes, seriously. I live in a country where elephants and people can cross paths (although, it wouldn’t be a great idea). How crazy is that?

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One of the many beautiful peacocks roaming around Camp YEAH over the weekend.

Each year volunteers in the Kavango Region host Camp YEAH. YEAH stands for Youth Exploring and Achieving in Health. The camp focuses on educating youth about the risk of HIV/AIDS and other issues affecting youth such as teen pregnancy. Volunteers and counterparts select motivated learners from their communities to participate.

This year, we will be introducing this camp to Ovamboland, creatively rebranding the name to Camp O-YEAH. Camp O-YEAH will be held during the first week of May. I have been put in charge of getting all the kitchen/nutrition stuff in order for camp. Since this is my first time being on the operations side of any camp, I figured this was a great opportunity to check out Camp YEAH, but also see how a camp kitchen is run.

When I completed my dietetics degree, I never thought I would use any food management concepts again. Not because I would never need to, but because I never wanted to EVER again. (Never say never, my friends!) I fell in love with the community health aspect of dietetics, and not so much with the food management or clinical side of it. Dietetic professionals know that creating menus to feed the masses takes a lot of time, math, tears, and preparation. Move to Namibia and add in converting everything from US to metric, and it turns into one heck of a good time.

I watched as a team of two volunteers with the assistance of a few locals cook and serve three meals per day to approximately 50 campers and staff. I was thoroughly impressed and mostly relieved that some school kitchens in Namibia are equipped with appliances found in commercial kitchens in the States. (They had a tilt skillet, y’all).

Mariah and Winnie cooked and introduced delicious new foods to the campers while reminding volunteers of the yummy foods we sacrificed for two years.

 

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Delicious cheese…oh, and chili.

 

For me, planning six days, 17 meals including 5 tea breaks, and 50 expected attendees will make anyone want to pull their hair out, but I think it will turn out just fine.

 

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Speaking of hair, do you like my new style? Can’t beat a new look for $10 USD.

 

❤ Krystal