mother bear project.

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Sometimes being a PCV is about spreading goodwill. As PCVs, we partner with NGOs (Non-Governmental Organizations), CBOs (Community-Based Organizations), and FBOs (Faith-Based Organizations) to help maximize effort. One organization in which many PCVs are able to work with during their service is The Mother Bear Project.

The Mother Bear Project is a non-profit organization based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It was founded “accidentally,” by Amy Berman, who we like to call The Mother Bear. The Mother Bear Project is dedicated to providing comfort and hope to children affected by HIV/AIDS by giving them a gift of love in the form of a hand-knit or crocheted bear.

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Knitters and crocheters from all over the world dedicate many hours to create each lovable bear. You can see from the photos how each bear is truly unique and in some ways, match the unique personalities of their learners.

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Becoming a bear maker is easy. With a $5 USD donation to the Mother Bear Project, you receive the pattern to create your bear. If you don’t know how to knit or crochet, you can sponsor a bear. Once you receive the pattern, you need at least 3 colors of yarn and ta-da! (I’m sure it’s a little more complicated than that, but you get the picture.) After completing your bear, you can sign your name on the tag included with your pattern and the Mother Bear Projects adds a felt heart to each bear before sending to partners, such as Peace Corps Volunteers, to hand deliver.

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Aren’t they precious?

❤ Krystal

[servant] leading to change.

My senior year of college, I was co-captain of my soccer team. I’ll admit, I was never the best player on the team, but I was voted by my teammates “Most Improved Player,” for two years consecutively (hey, I won something). I didn’t always have the right answers, but on and off the field I led by example.

When this translated into a business setting, I naturally developed a leadership style leaning more towards servant leadership. Servant leaders put the needs of others first which helps people to develop and to perform at their highest level. So, if this means sharing workloads, encouraging, and supporting, count me in. 

For me, I rather show people how to lead than show people how to follow. 

The word sustainable gets tossed around a lot when you’re working at a grassroot level. The idea of meeting people where they are is alive and well. In order to achieve sustainability, you must first approach change. 

As a health volunteer, a lot of my focus is on behavior change.

When I leave Namibia next year, I hope that positive change was inspired through my actions on a daily basis from my willingness to get my hands dirty or lend a helping hand. I want my actions each day to reflect my support and committment to change in my community.

I hope a decade from now that one person who thought they were following me will realize they were actually leading.

This post is part of Blogging Abroad’s 2017 New Years Blog Challenge, week four: Change and Hope.