skillet chocolate chip pumpkin bread

I won’t make any more promises about pumpkin recipes.

I feel as if cast iron skillets are quintessential for Fall baking. They remind me of the warmth of fireplaces and the heartiness of stews and soups cooked during this time of year.

I still wonder what America would look like if Starbucks made debuted a sweet potato latte instead of a pumpkin one. Anybody else? Maybe not. Is it only weird to me that we drink pumpkins?

Well, pumpkin is no stranger to my family’s Thanksgiving smorgasbord. From pies to custards, whether baked, boiled, or roasted, it makes an appearance in some form or fashion between October and December.

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I recently shared a picture on IG but didn’t share the recipe. Rookie mistake, sorry fam. Without further delay,

Skillet Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Bread

What you need:
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons pumpkin spice
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup dairy-free butter, room temperature (not melted)
3/4 cup raw brown sugar
1 chia “egg” (1 tablespoon chia seeds and 1 ½ tablespoon water, let sit for 5 minutes)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie filling)
1 ½ cups of dark chocolate chips, chunks, or chopped

What to do:
Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F.
In a large bowl, gently whisk the flour, pumpkin spice, baking soda, and salt.
Using an electric mixer, combine the butter and sugar. Mix on medium-high until ingredients creamed together.
Add chia egg, vanilla and pumpkin to wet mixture until combined.
Add dry ingredients into the wet ingredients until combined. Do not over mix.
Stir in 1 cup of chocolate chips.
Pour mixture into cast iron skillet leaving at least 1/4” inch at the top of the pan for rising. (If the skillet is well-seasoned, you will not need to grease it).
Smooth out mixture and sprinkle on the remaining 1/2 cup chocolate chips.
Bake for 35-40 minutes. Remove from the oven and leave in skillet to cool.

Enjoy!

❤ Krystal

ramblings on food recreation and thanksgiving.

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Entering this season of Thanksgiving, I realize how thankful I am for much in my life.  This year has taken me to so many new places and has exposed me to so many new experiences; I will forever be grateful.

I was reading an article today (read: not my revolution) which made me realize how thankful I am for food.

Now, hear me out.

In my world, I am able to go to the store and buy food I need to make it day-to-day. Sometimes, I even buy food I want and food I don’t need. I buy food to try, just for the sake of trying it. On most days, I have extra food in my shelves. Even on my most intentional days, I still waste more food than I should.

I can easily take hundreds of pictures of my food before I consume it, share it with friends, or freeze it for later.

In my world, food is first: a source of recreation, and second: a source of sustenance.

I think it’s easy to incorrectly filter my reality for everyone’s reality. I hope that these lessons will continue to push me to be thankful and giving in everything I do.

If you are going into the field of nutrition, I implore you to stay woke (I’ve been gone since 2016, hope I used that right) on nutrition topics, movements, and the know. I think it’s important to read about many nutrition topics, (even when you don’t agree with them). I try to stay abreast on new diets, MLM brands, supplements, cleanses, etc., in order to find evidence-based approaches to support or deny methods. Quickly, one can observe the demographics of these product consumers and easily see the divide between food as recreation and food as sustenance, which I mention above.

To be fair, having margin to buy food for food photography puts me in the same boat.  This article convicted me on so many levels. I could seriously go on and on.

While this time of year makes many of us more cognizant to give back and be thankful, I challenge each of you to make it a daily habit.

❤ Krystal